Where we are

I Quattro Canti, Palermo

Within a walled perimeter, which the Phoenicians built in the 4th century BC to mark out the nucleus of their city, in Via del Celso 14, not far from Quattro Canti and behind the Santa Ninfa dei Crociferi Church in an oasis of peace and quiet, you will find Nuvole Residenza. This boutique B+B can be found on the first and second floors of the Principe di San Vincenzo Palace. Next door are the ruins of the mighty walls of the Gran Cancelliere monastery, which was destroyed in the bombing raids of World War II.  Now sumac and acacia spring up and, once upon a time, a large mulberry tree shaded the road.

 GETTING TO THE NUVOLE RESIDENZA

FROM THE AIRPORT (34 Km):
Bus with the Prestia & Commandè service (€ 6.00) – recommended bus stop: via Roma 265 (Vucciria). From there take Via Napoli which leads to Via Maqueda, a few steps to the left and on the right Via del Celso.
Taxi: cost around € 40/45

FROM THE STATION (1 km):
on foot walk along Via Maqueda until you go past the crossroads at Quattro Canti. Continuing on Via Maqueda, turn left into Via del Celso and you will find the Nuvole Residenza at number 14 Via del Celso, 200 m further on.
by bus take the 101 bus in Via Roma (in front of the station) and get off at the crossroads with Corso Vittorio Emanuele. Turn left into Corso Vittorio Emanuele and walk up to the crossroads at Quattro Canti and from there turn right into Via Maqueda. Walk on for another 200 m and you will find Via del Celso on your left. The Nuvole Residenza is at number 14 Via del Celso, 200 m further on.

FROM THE PORT (1.8 km):
on foot (23 minutes) Walk along Via Emerico Amari until you get to the Teatro Politeama Garibaldi (4 minutes). Go past Teatro Politeama Garibaldi, turn left into Via Ruggero Settimo and walk along this road for about 1 km until it turns into Via Maqueda. Just before the crossroads at Quattro Canti, turn right into Via del Celso. The Nuvole Residenza is at number 14 Via del Celso, 200 m further on.

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Palermo

On foot
QUATTRO CANTI – 198 METRI – 2 MINUTI
PIAZZA PRETORIA – 270 METRI – 3 MINUTI
PALAZZO RISO – MUSEO D’ARTE
CONTEMPORANEA – 240 METRI – 3 MINUTI
CHIESA DELLA MARTORANA
338 METRI – 4 MINUTI
LA VUCCIRIA – 409 METRI – 4 MINUTI
PIAZZA BEATI PAOLI E IL MERCATO DEL CAPO – 489 METRI – 5 MINUTI
TEATRO MASSIMO – 500 METRI – 6 MINUTI
CATTEDRALE – 700 METRI – 7 MINUTI
IL MERCATO DI BALLARO’ – 700 METRI – 8 MINUTI
IL MERCATO DELLE PULCI – 800 METRI – 9 MINUTI
LA CALA E IL MARE – 800 METRI – 9 MINUTI
CAPPELLA PALATINA – 1200 METRI – 15 MINUTI

 

 THE HISTORY AND RENOVATION OF THE PRINCIPE DI SAN VINCENZO PALACE

The renovation of the Principe di San Vincenzo Palace, a privately commissioned project with the aamp architectural offices in Palermo, began in 2005. At that time the building was uninhabitable: floors and false ceilings had caved in, there was rubble everywhere, the majolica tiles had been looted and the frescoes destroyed. After renovation work lasting five years, the building was restored to its former glory.

The historical origins of the Palace date back to far-off times: the medieval double lancet window set into the façade on Via Marotta has been quoted by the architect Giuseppe Spatrisano in his publication (in Italian) The Steri of Palermo and Sicilian Architecture of the 14th Century. This window on the third floor is framed by a decorated arched lintel with quatrefoiled (four-lobed shape), pyramid-shaped dentils (small blocks, constituting a repeating ornament) with star-patterned fretwork in the centre.

In the 17th century the Palace belonged to the doctors Giovanni Pompilo Sicco and don Diego Marotta, the latter who was President of the Real Concistoro (an Ecclesiastical Council) and the Regia Corte (the Royal Court). It was then purchased by the La Torre Princes and, at the beginning of the 18th century, the Palace was bequeathed to don Vincenzo Vanni. This passage marked the beginning of its glorious splendor: the building was festooned with decorations from a design published in Palermo in 1736 – La Reggia in trionfo – by Pietro La Placa. In that period, Prince don Vincenzo Vanni summoned Guglielmo Borremans to decorate the great ballroom. Commissioned with the task of painting frescoes for the great ballroom, Borremans, a Flemish painter created a fresco depicting Glory with all those virtues requisite in a Prince; it was subsequently removed and transferred to canvas but never found. One of the most important transformations in the area dates back to the levelling of Via del Celso to connect it with Via Maqueda. The Palace’s current external appearance is the result of work carried out in the 19th century.